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New Jersey
Hackensack University Medical Center Participates in National Conference on Pharmaceutical and Chemical Diversion
Story Number is : 011418115
PROVIDED
Hackensack Meridian Health Hackensack University Medical Center

 
Provided
Michael A. Kelly, M.D.
Michael A. Kelly, M.D., chair, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine and chair, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Hackensack Meridian Health Hackensack University Medical Center, was a featured presenter at the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Diversion Control Division, 23rd National Conference on Pharmaceutical and Chemical Diversion in Dallas, Texas. This national conference was held to facilitate the exchange of information between DEA and their state and local counterparts who focus on combating the diversion of pharmaceutical controlled substances and regulated chemicals.

Dr. Kelly was invited to speak about opioid addiction from a physician standpoint in treating patients for pain. He spoke about the program at Hackensack University Medical Center which is minimizing the use of opioids in the care of patients.
“At Hackensack University Medical Center, we’ve been minimizing the use of opioids in managing pain post-operatively, particularly in our implant and total knee replacement program,” said Michael A. Kelly, M.D., chair, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine and chair, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Hackensack University Medical Center. “We started replacing the intravenous opioids with a multimodal approach, meaning the use of two agents or more to minimize pain. In essence, instead of using just one agent that has a lot of side effects, plus the risk of addiction, we now use several non-opioid agents before surgery, during surgery and after surgery to minimize the need for opioids.”

Dr. Kelly travels the country lecturing about minimizing the use of opioids, which have caused 64,000 overdose deaths in 2016 alone, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. According to Dr. Kelly, the number of patients who become addicted to opioids after using them post-operatively is troubling.
“It is clear that the abuse of opioids is a very severe problem physically, emotionally and financially not only in New Jersey, but across the United States,” said Ihor S. Sawczuk, M.D., president of Hackensack University Medical Center. “First time exposure can lead to long term addiction. Surgeons, along with physicians in general and dentists are part of this problem while attempting to manage pain for their patients. What Hackensack University Medical Center has done to minimize the use of opioids is most definitely a step in the right direction and I applaud our team for taking the initiative to protect our patients.”

In 2017, Dr. Kelly presented at a town hall meeting at Bergen Community College in Paramus entitled, ”Knockout Opioids.” The town hall, which featured guest speakers, and a five-person panel of experts with backgrounds in law enforcement, medicine, treatment and prevention, addressed people affected by the epidemic. Dr. Kelly, who has been performing total knee replacements and treating sports related Orthopaedic injuries for 30 years, was instrumental in establishing the Hackensack University Medical Center Orthopaedic Institute, which offers a multidisciplinary and collaborative approach to treating all aspects of musculoskeletal disorders.

Dr. Kelly has also presented at the National Rx Drug Abuse Summit in Atlanta, GA. His talk entitled, “Opioid Addiction May Start in Acute Care Settings,” focused on orthopedists and surgeons managing pain adequately to have better outcomes for patients. Dr. Kelly explains that while opioids have become a significant part of most surgeons pain care, they’ve also contributed to the addiction epidemic.
“Doctors aren’t all bad. We are trying to combat the opioid addiction problem by minimizing the exposure to patients, either by reducing the number of prescriptions, or not giving opioids entirely to manage pain. We can certainly fight the opioid epidemic by preventing it in the first place.”

Dr. Kelly is spearheading a program for personalizing pain management, including the use of genetic testing to determine which patients are most at-risk for addiction. Hackensack University Medical Center has also formed an opioid task force to minimize the use of opioids in other specialties post-operatively.



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